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Olympic Games

I (1st) WINTER GAMES
CHAMONIX, FRANCE | Jan 25th - Feb 5th, 1924


Chamonix, FRA


Chamonix 1924

CHAMONIX, FRANCE
1st WINTER GAMES

January 25 - February 5, 1924

Mascot - none

16 countries, 258 athletes (13 women)

6 sports, 16 events

Opening - Under Secretary for Physical Education Gaston Vidal

Torch lit by - none

Held here in conjunction with Paris 1924's Games of the Olympiad

Originally skating and ice hockey events took place as part of the Summer Games of 1908 and 1920, however it was decided to hold a separate Winter Games. The Chamonix Games were originally known as an "International Winter Sports Week," due to objections by Scandinavian countries that felt a Winter Olympics would detract from their Nordic Games. It was not until 1926 during the 25th Session of the International Olympic Committee (IOC) in Lisbon, Portugal that the Chamonix Sports Week was retroactively given the name of Olympic Winter Games.

Chamonix, the famous international tourist resort at the foot of picturesque Mont Blanc, was the host of the first ever Winter Olympic Games. The first Winter Games, or "White Olympics" as it was called then, consisted of 14 events in five sports (Nordic skiing, figure skating, speedskating, hockey and bobsledding). Norwegian athletes medalled in 12 of the 14 events, the most by any nation. The only sports Norway did not win a medal were in ice hockey, where Canada took the gold, and bobsledding, which saw a Swiss team finish first in the four-man team event.

American Charles Jewtraw won the men's 500m speed skating event to become the first ever official Olympic Winter Games gold medalist. However it was Clas Thunberg, a Finnish speed skater, who dazzled the crowd with five medals, an achievement that was not equaled for 56 years. Canada won the men's ice hockey competition with an aggregate score against their opponents of 110-3.

Anders Haugen (USA) waited 50 years to receive his bronze ski jumping medal. Deprived of his third place because of a marking error, Haugen won his case and obtained his medal aged 83! The official medal ceremony was not held until 5 February, shortly before the closing speech by Pierre de Coubertin. As some athletes had already gone home, Frantz Reichel presented their medals to other members of their teams.

The organization was faulty but the success was nonetheless great despite the huge absence of Germany and the then Soviet Union.

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6 sports, 16 events

N
O
R

F
I
N

A
U
T

S
U
I

U
S
A

G
B
R

S
W
E

C
A
N

 

BIATHLON

     

1

       

1

BOBSLEIGH

     

1

       

1

CURLING

         

1

   

1

ICE HOCKEY

             

1

1

SKATING

                 

Figure Skating

   

2

     

1

 

3

Speed Skating

 

4

   

1

     

5

SKIING

                 

Cross-Country Skiing

2

             

2

Nordic Combined

1

             

1

Ski Jumping

1

             

1

TOTAL

4

4

2

2

1

1

1

1

16

GOLD MEDAL WINNERS
(14 Men, 1 Women, 1 Combined events)

BIATHLON
Military Patrol: Switzerland

BOBSLEIGH
Four-Man: Switzerland

CURLING
Team: Great Britain

ICE HOCKEY
Men's Team: Canada

SKATING

FIGURE SKATING
Singles: Gillis Grafström, Sweden
W\Singles: Herma Planck Szabo, Austria
Pairs: Helene Engelmann/Alfred Berger, Austria

SPEED SKATING
500m: Charles Jewtraw, United States
1500m: Clas Thunberg, Finland
5000m: Clas Thunberg, Finland
10000m: Julius Skutnabb, Finland
Four-Races Combined: Clas Thunberg, FIN

SKIING

CROSS-COUNTRY SKIING
18km Classical: Thorleif Haug, Norway
50km Classical: Thorleif Haug, Norway

NORDIC COMBINED
Individual: Thorleif Haug, Norway

SKI JUMPING
K-90 Individual: Jacob Tullin Thams, Norway

Country

G

S

B

TTL

Norway

4

7

6

17

Finland

4

4

3

11

Austria

2

1

0

3

Switzerland

2

0

1

3

USA

1

2

1

4

Great Britain

1

1

2

4

Sweden

1

1

0

2

Canada

1

0

0

1

France

0

0

3

3

Belgium

0

0

1

1

Total

16

16

17

49

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