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Olympic Games

III (3rd) WINTER GAMES
LAKE PLACID, USA | February 4th - 15th, 1932


Lake Placid, USA


Lake Placid 1932 Lake Placid, USA
IIIrd WINTER GAMES

February 4 - 15, 1932

Mascot - none

17 countries, 252 athletes (21 women)

4 sports, 14 events

Opening - Governor Franklin D Roosevelt of New York

Torch lit by - none

Bear Mountain, Denver, Duluth, Lake Tahoe, Minneapolis, Yosemite Valley (all USA) and Montreal (CAN)

The Olympic Games came to the United States for the first time in 1932. Lake Placid was a ski station among the Adirondacks in the State of New York. The traditional dominion of the Norwegian cross-country skiers was decidedly shaken in the third edition of the Winter Games which went outside of Europe for the first time. The Games at Lake Placid included the debut of the two-man bobsled event, and three demonstration sports: women's speedskating, dog-sled racing and curling (for the second time). Snow had to be trucked in so that the ski jump competition staging area could be covered.

Right from the start, the Lake Placid Games were looking to make history. During the opening ceremony, the British contingent's flag was carried by a woman, an Olympic first. The Americans won the four-man bobsled, and team member Eddie Eagan became the first and only man to win both a Summer and Winter Olympic medal -- Eagan won the 1920 light heavyweight boxing gold medal.

The speed skating events were unique in that they did not follow the traditional European format of paired races, but rather group starts, heats, and elimination, much like track events. Loud and angry protests about the new rules imposed by the organizers led to the withdrawl of the great Clas Thunberg, making way for the overwhelming American success of "Jack" Shea and Irving Jaffee.

Sonja Henie continued her domination of ladies' figure skating. However, two-time defending Olympic men's figure skating gold medallist Gillis Grafstrom finished second to 22-year-old Austrian Karl Schafer. Both figure skating competitions took place indoors for the first time. Canada's domination of ice hockey continued, but it was not as easy as before. The final between the United States and Canada ended in a tie after three overtimes. Canada was declared the winner on the basis of a better goal average throughout the Olympics.

The United States led the medal standings with 12 medals.

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4 sports, 14 events

U
S
A

N
O
R

S
W
E

C
A
N

F
I
N

A
U
T

F
R
A

 

BOBSLEIGH

2

           

2

ICE HOCKEY

     

1

     

1

SKATING

               

Figure Skating

 

1

     

1

1

3

Speed Skating

4

           

4

SKIING

               

Cross-Country Skiing

   

1

 

1

   

2

Nordic Combined

 

1

         

1

Ski Jumping

 

1

         

1

TOTAL

6

3

1

1

1

1

1

14

GOLD MEDAL WINNERS
(2 new events; Luge sport removed)
(12 Men, 1 Women, 1 Combined events)

BOBSLEIGH
Two-Man: J. Hubert Stevens/Curtis Stevens, USA
Four-Man: United States

ICE HOCKEY
Men's Team: Canada

SKIING

CROSS-COUNTRY SKIING
18km Classical: Sven Utterström, Sweden
50km Classical: Veli Saarinen, Finland

NORDIC COMBINED
Individual: Johan Grøttumsbråten, Norway

SKI JUMPING
K-90 Individual: Birger Ruud, NOR

SKATING

FIGURE SKATING
Singles: Karl SCHÄFER, Austria
W\Singles: Sonja Henie, Norway
Pairs: Andree Brunet (Joly)/Pierre Brunet, France

SPEED SKATING
500m: John A. Shea, United States
1500m: John A. Shea, United States
5000m: Irving Jaffee, United States
10000m: Irving Jaffee, United States

Lake Placid 1932

Country

G

S

B

TTL

USA

6

4

2

12

Norway

3

4

3

10

Sweden

1

2

0

3

Canada

1

1

5

7

Finland

1

1

1

3

Austria

1

1

0

2

France

1

0

0

1

Switzerland

0

1

0

1

Germany

0

0

2

2

Hungary

0

0

1

1

TOTAL

14

14

14

42

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