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Olympic Games

IX (9th) WINTER GAMES
INNSBRUCK, AUSTRIA | Jan 29th - Feb 9th, 1964


Innsbruck, AUT


Innsbruck 1964

Innsbruck, Austria
IXth WINTER GAMES

January 29 - February 9, 1964

Mascot - none

36 countries, 1091 athletes (200 women)

6 sports, 34 events

Opening - President Dr. Adolf Scharf

Torch lit by - Joseph Rieder

Candidates: Calgary, Lahti/Are (FIN)

The IOC unanimously selected Innsbruck for the Games which returned to Europe. The competitions were held all over the city with distances of over 30 kilometres between facilities. For the first time there were more than 1,000 athletes present and there were over a million spectators. The Innsbruck games were also the first ones to be fully "covered" by television which contributed to increasing their success. The only real problem was the lack of snow, a circumstance which involved a tremendous amount of work by whole detachments of the Austrian army who transported over 20,000 cubic metres of snow from the seas of the North. Computers appeared at the Innsbruck Olympics and the timing became electronic.

Luge made its debut; ski jumping was divided into two separate events; and bobsledding returned.

The unquestionable star of Innsbruck was Lydia Skoblikova. A double-gold medalist at Squaw Valley, the Soviet speed skater swept all four speed skating events to become the first person to win four gold medals at a single Olympic Winter Games. Almost equally impressive was the performance by another Siberia native, Klaudia Boyarskikh, a Nordic skier who won the 5km, 10km, and 3x5km relay.

The Americans' success in figure skating ended as they failed to win a gold for the first time. But it was more a story of tragedy than failure. In 1961 the entire U.S. figure skating team, including coaches, died in a plane crash on the way to the World Championships. In light of this, the bronze medal that 14-year-old Scott Allen won was quite remarkable.

Richard Terrence McDermott, a 23-year-old barber, became the only American to win a gold medal when he captured the 500m speed skating title in an Olympic-record 40.1 seconds. The rest of the U.S. medals came in alpine skiing.

In the bobsled competition, two surprise winners surfaced. In the four-man, Canada upset the Italians, and the British upset the Italians in the two-man. The only other major upset of the Games was that of the Canadian hockey team failing to medal in an event once again won by the Soviet Union.

The Soviet Union continued its domination with 25 medals.

1924 
1928 
1932 
1936 
1948 
1952 
1956 
1960 
1964 
1968 
1972 
1976 
1980 
1984 
1988 
1992 
1994 
1998 
2002 
2006 
2010 

 

 

6 sports, 34 events

U
R
S

A
U
T

N
O
R

F
I
N

F
R
A

S
W
E

G
D
R

U
S
A

F
R
G

N
E
D

C
A
N

G
B
R

 

BIATHLON

1

                     

1

BOBSLEIGH

                   

1

1

2

ICE HOCKEY

1

                     

1

LUGE

 

1

       

2

         

3

SKATING

                         

Figure Skating

1

             

1

1

   

3

Speed Skating

5

 

1

   

1

 

1

       

9

SKIING

                         

Alpine Skiing

 

3

   

3

             

6

Cross-Country Skiing

3

   

2

 

2

           

7

Nordic Combined

   

1

                 

1

Ski Jumping

   

1

1

               

2

TOTAL

11

4

3

3

3

3

2

1

1

1

1

1

34

GOLD MEDAL WINNERS

(7 new events added, Reinstated sports - Bobsled & Luge)
(21 Men, 12 Women, 1 Combined Events)

BIATHLON
M\20km: Vladimir Melyanin, USSR

BOBSLEIGH (NEW)


M\Two-Man: Anthony Nash/Robin Dixon, GBR
M\Four-Man: Canada

ICE HOCKEY
Men's Team: Soviet Union

LUGE (NEW)

M\Single: Thomas Köhler, Germany
M\Double: Josef Feistmantl/Manfred Stengl,  AUT
W\Single: Ortrun Enderlein, Germany

SKIING

ALPINE SKIING

M\Downhill: Egon Zimmermann, Austria
M\Slalom: Josef Stiegler, Austria
M\Giant Slalom: Francois Bonlieu, France
W\Downhill: Christl Haas, Austria
W\Slalom: Christine Goitschel, France
W\Giant Slalom: Marielle Goitschel, France

CROSS-COUNTRY SKIING
M\15km Classical: Eero MÄNTYRANTA, Finland
M\30km Classical: Eero MÄNTYRANTA, Finland
M\50km Classical: Sixten Jernberg, Sweden
M\4x10km Relay: Sweden
W\5km Classical: Klavdiya Boyarskikh, USSR
W\10km Classical: Klavdiya Boyarskikh, USSR
W\3x5km Relay: Soviet Union

NORDIC COMBINED
M\Individual: Tormod Knutsen, Norway

SKI JUMPING
M\K-90 Individual: Veikko Kankkonen, Finland
M\K-120 Individual
: Toralf Engan, Norway

FIGURE SKATING
M\Singles: Manfred Schnelldorfer, Germany
W\Singles: Sjoukje Dijkstra, Netherlands
Pairs: Lyudmila Belousova/Oleg Protopopov, USSR

SPEED SKATING
M\500m: Richard McDermott, United States
M\1500m: Ants Antson, USSR
M\5000m: Knut Johannesen, Norway
M\10000m: Jonny Nilsson, Sweden
W\500m: Lydia Skoblikova, USSR
W\1000m: Lydia Skoblikova, USSR
W\1500m: Lydia Skoblikova, USSR
W\3000m: Lydia Skoblikova, USSR

Country

G

S

B

TTL

USSR 

11

8

6

25

Austria

4

5

3

12

Norway

3

6

6

15

Finland

3

4

3

10

France

3

4

0

7

Germany

3

3

3

9

Sweden

3

3

1

7

United States

1

2

3

6

Netherlands

1

1

0

2

Canada

1

0

2

3

Great Britain

1

0

0

1

Italy

0

1

3

4

North Korea

0

1

0

1

Czechoslovakia

0

0

1

1

TOTAL

34

38

41

113

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