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Olympic Games

XI (11th) WINTER GAMES
SAPPORO, JAPAN | February 3rd - 13th, 1972


Sapporo, JPN


Sapporo 1972

Sapporo, Japan
XIth WINTER GAMES

February 3 - 13, 1972

Mascot - none

35 countries, 1006 athletes (206 women)

6 sports, 35 events

Opening - Emperor Hirohito

Torch lit by - Hideki Takada

Candidates: Banff, Lahti/Are (FIN), Salt Lake City

This was the first time for the East. The eleventh edition of the Olympics was held in Sapporo, Japan. Sapporo originally was scheduled to be the site of the 1940 Winter Games, but Japan resigned as the Games' host nation after its 1937 invasion of China. Organizers of the Sapporo Winter Olympics turned a tidy profit for the Games, largely as a result of their take of the record $8.47 million for the broadcast rights.

In return for the Olympic flame to the East, the Japanese invested a fortune in facilities and structures in Sapporo, a city with over 1,500,000 inhabitants, capital of the Hokkaido island. For the occasion, in addition to the stadiums, an airport, a tunnel under the sea and an underground railway were constructed. Two of the most pernicious phenomena related to the games became more pronounced: economic giantism and risky political implications.

The Austrian downhill skier Karl Schranz, one of the most famous athletes of all time, was accused of professionalism and excluded from the contest. Canada pulled out of the ice hockey competition over a dispute over the amateur status of many of the hockey players. The Canadians felt that so-called state-sponsored East European teams were in fact professional in nature, and believed that they too should be allowed to send their best to the Olympics.

Japanese athletes took the chance to perform in front of their home crowds, and dazzled with a complete medal sweep of the 70-meter ski-jumping event.

Among the other sensational stars of the Games were Dutch speed skater Ard Schenk, who won three gold medals and nearly missed a fourth when he tripped in the 500m, Soviet cross-county skier Galina Kulakova swept all three women's events, and Swiss teen-ager Marie-Theres Nadig upset all favorites to win both the downhill and giant slalom. In the slalom, American Barbara Ann Cochran took America's first alpine gold since 1952.

The U.S. hockey team managed to claim a silver behind the invincible Soviets, who once again took gold. The Canadians and Swedes boycotted the hockey competition to protest what they felt were unfair definitions of professionals. NHL players were not allowed to play in the Olympics, however the Eastern-Bloc countries' professionals were allowed to play.

The Soviets returned to the top of the medals table with 16.

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6 sports, 35 events

U
R
S

G
D
R

S
U
I

N
E
D

U
S
A

F
R
G

N
O
R

I
T
A

A
U
T

S
W
E

J
P
N

T
C
H

P
O
L

E
S
P

 

BIATHLON

1

         

1

             

2

BOBSLEIGH

   

1

   

1

               

2

ICE HOCKEY

1

                         

1

LUGE

 

3

         

1

           

4*

SKATING

                             

Figure Skating

1

             

1

   

1

   

3

Speed Skating

     

4

2

2

               

8

SKIING

                             

Alpine Skiing

   

3

 

1

   

1

         

1

6

Cross-Country Skiing

5

         

1

   

1

       

7

Nordic Combined

 

1

                       

1

Ski Jumping

                   

1

 

1

 

2

TOTAL

8

5

4

4

3

3

2

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

36

* 2 gold medals awarded in Men's Luge - Doubles

GOLD MEDAL WINNERS

(All events same as 1968)
(22 Men, 12 Women, 1 Combined)

BIATHLON
M\20km: Magnar Solberg, Norway
M\4x7.5km Relay: Soviet Union

BOBSLEIGH
M\Two-Man: Wolfgang Zimmerer/Peter Utzschneider, West Germany
M\Four-Man: Switzerland

ICE HOCKEY
Men's Team: Soviet Union

LUGE

M\Single: Wolfgang Scheidel, East Germany
M\Double: Horst Hornlein/Reinhard Bredow, GDR & Paul Hildgartner/Walter Plaikner, ITA
W\Single: Anna-Maria MÜLLER, East Germany

SKIING

ALPINE SKIING

M\Downhill: Bernhard Russi, Switzerland
M\Slalom: Francisco Fernandez Ochoa, Spain
M\Giant Slalom: Gustav Thoni, Italy
W\Downhill: Marie-Theres Nadig, Switzerland
W\Slalom: Barbara Cochran, United States
W\Giant Slalom: Marie-Theres Nadig, Switzerland

CROSS-COUNTRY SKIING


M\15km Classical: Sven-Ake LUNDBÄCK, Sweden
M\30km Classical: Vyacheslav Vedenin, USSR
M\50km Classical: Paal Tyldum, Norway
M\4x10km Relay: Soviet Union
W\5km Classical: Galina Kulakova, USSR
W\10km Classical: Galina Kulakokva, USSR
W\3x5km Relay: Soviet Union

NORDIC COMBINED
M\Individual: Ulrich Wehling, East Germany

SKI JUMPING
M\K-90 Individual: Yukio Kasaya, Japan
M\K-120 Individual: Wojciech Fortuna, Poland

SKATING

FIGURE SKATING
M\Singles: Ondrej Nepela, Czechoslovakia
W\Singles: Beatrix Schuba, Austria
Pairs: Irina Rodnina/Aleksei Ulanov, USSR

SPEED SKATING
M\500m: Erhard Keller, West Germany
M\1500m: Adrianus Schenk, Netherlands
M\5000m: Adrianus Schenk, Netherlands
M\10000m: Adrianus Schenk, Netherlands
W\500m: Anne Henning, United States
W\1000m: Monika Pflug, West Germany
W\1500m: Dianne Holum, United States
W\3000m: Christina Baas-Kaiser, Netherlands

 

Country

G

S

B

TTL

USSR 

8

5

3

16

East Germany

4

3

7

14

Switzerland

4

3

3

10

Netherlands

4

3

2

9

United States

3

2

3

8

West Germany

3

1

1

5

Norway

2

5

5

12

Italy

2

2

1

5

Austria

1

2

2

5

Sweden

1

1

2

4

Japan

1

1

1

3

Czechoslovakia

1

0

2

3

Poland

1

0

0

1

Spain

1

0

0

1

Finland

0

4

1

5

France

0

1

2

3

Canada

0

1

0

1

TOTAL

36

34

35

105

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